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Animal Sheltering magazine July/August 2014: Table of Contents

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  • Magazine Article

    Mutterings

    Pictured with Ruby (left) and Alexis, stray cat Max was taken in by Ruby’s mother after being hit by a car. Pets for Life covered the cost of amputating his shattered leg, as well as basic veterinary care.

    A round-up of fun, inspiring news tidbits from the animal welfare world.

    January/February 2016

    Pets for Life Reaches a Milestone

    Usher and Barbara Stovall first encountered Pets for Life (PFL) a few years ago, when outreach teams began knocking on doors in their Atlanta neighborhood. The couple had adopted a puppy whose previous owner couldn’t keep her, and after chatting with staff from PFL, the Stovalls signed Peggy up for a spay surgery, vaccinations and weekly PFL training classes. Over the years, outreach team members checked in, watching “little” Peggy grow into a big girl.

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  • Magazine Article

    Good Colonies Make Good Neighbors

    Trap-neuter-return, smart caretaking practices and proactive neighborhood diplomacy are key to helping community cats coexist peacefully with the people around them.

    With diplomacy and problem-solving skills, advocates can create a harmonious relationship between community cats and the people around them

    January/February 2016

    When she got the complaint that stray cats were “using the restroom” on the sidewalk in front of a church, Renee Clark was skeptical, but she drove over to study the droppings in question. “It was pretty obvious that the poop there wasn’t cat waste; it was probably raccoon,” says Clark, an environmental biologist and feline advocate in Staunton, Va.

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  • Magazine Article

    Cooped-Up Pooches? Loan 'Em Out!

    The Dog Trotter program helps keep the Delaware County SPCA’s canines well-exercised.

    A temporary buddy for your sheltered pooches can help them burn off energy—and even get adopted

    January/February 2016

    I t’s a fact: A socialized and well-exercised shelter dog is happier, easier to care for and more likely to win favor with visitors. But keeping all those dogs fit, busy and happy is a challenge.

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  • Magazine Article

    Moving Animals—in the Right Direction

    Wayne Pacelle and his adopted dog, Lily

    January/February 2016

    The long-distance transport of rescued animals—from state to state and even from far-away countries—has long given animals in trouble a second chance. The gale-force winds of Hurricane Katrina and the massive rescue work it inspired produced a nationwide diaspora of Gulf Coast animals. The shelters in Louisiana and Mississippi were either submerged or full, and long-distance transport was the only way to save lives.

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  • Magazine Article

    Forget the Fairy Tale

    Lowering your drawbridge will help more adopters and animals live happily ever after

    January/February 2016

    Almost two years ago, I set out to adopt a Chihuahua from a rescue group that prides itself on finding “carefully screened forever homes.”

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  • Magazine Article

    Winter Warm-Up

    Volunteers for the Houses of Wood and Straw (HOWS) Project in Virginia go out every Saturday from late October through March to deliver doghouses and talk to owners about winter pet care.

    Shelters and rescue groups give people resources to help animals beat the cold

    January/February 2016

    “There’s not going to be a cat who doesn’t have some kind of shelter for the winter.”

    It’s a bold statement from Indianapolis animal advocate Lisa Tudor, but that’s how widespread efforts have become in her area to keep community cats warm, she says.

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