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Animal Sheltering magazine

A magazine for anyone who cares about the health and happiness of animals and people in their community, Animal Sheltering goes beyond the four walls of shelters and rescues to look at the broader picture of the state of pets in the U.S. We cover stories that inform and entertain, empowering and inspiring you in your daily work. From those working to save more animals’ lives at the shelter to those helping prevent pets from being there in the first place, we’re covering the people and organizations that are making a difference. Read us, share with us, talk to us. Together, we’re changing the story.

Find Recent Articles

  • Animal Sheltering Magazine January/February 2016
  • Animal Sheltering magazine November/December 2015
  • Animal Sheltering Magazine September/October 2015

Scoop

  • President's Note

    Moving Animals—in the Right Direction

    The long-distance transport of rescued animals—from state to state and even from far-away countries—has long given animals in trouble a second chance. The gale-force winds of Hurricane Katrina and the massive rescue work it inspired produced a nationwide diaspora of Gulf Coast animals. The shelters in Louisiana and Mississippi were either submerged or full, and long-distance transport was the only way to save lives.

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  • 101 Department

    Forget the Fairy Tale

    Lowering your drawbridge will help more adopters and animals live happily ever after

    Almost two years ago, I set out to adopt a Chihuahua from a rescue group that prides itself on finding “carefully screened forever homes.”

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  • Rescue Central

    Rethinking Returns

    Repurposing a shelter management tool to control the flow of animals who come back

    It’s a scenario longtime rescuers have nightmares about, and yet we rarely see it coming: One day, seemingly out of the blue, you get the email message: “URGENT! I need to return Fido to you this weekend!”

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  • Shelter Medicine

    Making the Shelter a Happier Place for Animals

    Practical tips on how to help the animals in your care feel good

    Read the first of Dr. Griffin’s columns on emotional wellness in the Sep-Oct 2015 issue of Animal Sheltering.

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  • Unforgettable

    Marvelous Mervin

    Toothless Mervin gets thousands of "likes" on Instagram and even more love from his family.

    The first time I saw Mervin, he was burrowed under a blanket with just his little head sticking out, barking (or yelling, as I like to call it), at nothing in particular. He clearly had a lot to say. I could feel that there was something special about this little guy.

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Explore other Animal Sheltering magazine content

  • Magazine Article

    The Road to Happy Returns

    1. A community cat spots a humane box trap.

    How to safely trap and transport feral and community cats

    September/October 2014

    When she heard that Animal Sheltering was planning a whole story on transporting feral cats, one expert (whose name we’ll withhold to avoid embarrassing her) was skeptical. Transport is pretty simple, she said.

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  • Magazine Article

    The Power of Taking a Walk

    Diane Blankenburg (left), community programs/development director at the Nevada Humane Society, chats with shelter staff.

    Want to know what’s really happening in your organization? Go see for yourself.

    September/October 2014

    There have never been more tools to facilitate communication than we have today. We can quickly and easily reach almost anyone nearly anywhere with a text, email or call. Perhaps it’s because technology is so convenient that it has all but replaced face-to-face interactions in some workplaces. We issue a memo or announce a new policy via email, and feel confident that we have made our intentions clear.

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  • Magazine Article

    So, Like, Wanna Adopt a Cat?

    The Animal Protective League poked fun at human teens in its light-spirited cat adoption campaign.

    These teens don’t sneer—they purr

    September/October 2014

    Teenagers. The word alone is enough to slump the shoulders of even the most patient parents. Sure, you love ’em, but sometimes it seems like every single thing you do makes them annoyed, angry or just plain embarrassed.

    But what if you could adopt the perfect teenager, one who would be a friend instead of running up your phone bill or making fun of your mom-jeans? The Animal Protective League (APL) of Springfield, Ill., found a way to make that happen.

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  • Magazine Article

    Red or Blue: United We Stand for Dogs and Cats

    Wayne Pacelle and his adopted dog, Lily

    September/October 2014

    Are we a cat nation or a dog nation? A good number of households, like mine, have representatives from both camps. But there are some geographic variances at work. According to data from the American Veterinary Medical Association, cats outnumber dogs in the Northeast, Upper Midwest and on the West Coast, while dogs outnumber cats across the South. These numbers also line up quite neatly with voting performance: Cats are typically more popular in blue states, while dogs are more popular in red states. (With my cat Zoe and my dog Lily, I’m trying to stay bipartisan.)

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  • Magazine Article

    Paying it Forward in Michigan

    Illustration by bussolati

    Visiting days with other organizations make for chances to learn and network

    September/October 2014

    After nearly two years of research and lots of advice and input from other organizations, the Michigan Humane Society (MHS) decided to dramatically change its intake procedures. For many years, our open-admission policy was defined as taking in every animal brought to our doors at any time. It was not uncommon to receive more than 80 animals in one day at just one of MHS’s three animal care facilities. The stress on our team and the incoming animals was dramatic. We felt there had to be a better way to serve the animals in our communities.

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  • Magazine Article

    NiPPed in the Bud

    Through the Relo-Cat program, Ale found a permanent home on the grounds of a Washington, D.C., church.

    Two shelter programs in Washington, D.C., target community cats

    September/October 2014

    In spring of 2013, Ale, a stray cat, was left in a trap in front of a private Washington, D.C., shelter, then transported to the Washington Humane Society (WHS)—a municipal shelter with a stray contract. Scared and unsocial, he provided only one clue about his former life: He was ear-tipped, signifying that he had been sterilized as part of a community cat colony.

    Historically, there had been few options for cats like Ale. The WHS staff had no clue where he came from, and his fear of humans made him an unlikely candidate for adoption.

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