rescue. reunite. rehome. rethink.
  • Share to Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email
  • Print


  • Tufts Animal Care and Condition Scales

    The Tufts Animal Care and Condition (TACC) Scales were developed in 1997 by Dr. Gary Patronek, with assistance from Lori Donley, MS '97, the Fort Wayne Dept. of Animal Care and Control, and the Law Enforcement Division of the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals to help cruelty investigators and veterinarians assess cases of animal abuse or neglect that are primarily related to husbandry, as opposed to deliberate acts of cruelty.

  • Myths and Facts about Canine Parvovirus '2c'

    This article explores the facts and myths about Canine Parvovirus (CPV) strain 2c.

  • July 1, 2015

    What Goes Down ...

    Your adopters and novice foster caregivers may not be prepared for that horking sound longtime cat owners know so well. Here's what one kitty devotee learned when he explored the world of cat vomit.

  • May 1, 2015

    What's Your Magic Number?

    Learn how you can analyze your shelter’s capacity for care using real data to calculate the number of animals your shelter can comfortably care for.

  • May 1, 2015

    A New Learning Curve

    New cat behavior counseling course empowers participants to think beyond the walls of their shelter or rescue to assist owners who are thinking of surrendering their cats.

  • May 1, 2015

    Breaking Down Care Barriers

    Discover how many shelters are partnering with local veterinarians to implement medical intervention programs that help loving pet owners keep their animals.

  • November 1, 2014

    Spore Wars

    Austin Pets Alive's, Brittany Dell'Aglio Mitchell conquers feline ringworm infections.

  • September 1, 2014

    Paying it Forward in Michigan

    Michigan Humane Society and the Michigan Partnership for Animal Welfare helps bridge distances and increase undertanding and collaboration among divers animal care agencies across the state.

  • September 1, 2014

    A Good Man in a Hard Job

    A career spent ensuring softer departures for animals, and helping animal welfare workers cope.

  • September 1, 2014

    Closed for Safety

    Sometimes the safest response to an infectious disease outbreak is to temporarily close your shelter. It's a difficult decsion, and one with the potential to generate negative publicity. But shelter veterinarians must make it a priority to protect the health of the animals as well as the public, and being transparent about your actions will ultimately build trust. Learn how to cope with an outbreak-and it's aftermath.

Items 1 - 10 of 209  12345678910Next
Powered by Blackbaud
nonprofit software