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The Behavior Department: What Placement Groups Say'and What Adopters Hear

Sometimes our limited perspective keeps us from giving adopters the information they need

Sometimes our limited perspective keeps us from giving adopters the information they need

THE CASES

Adopters want their dogs to be affectionate. But a dog who becomes attached to one person while remaining fearful of others can present problems in the home.
WOLFGANG SCHOENFELD/ISTOCKPHOTO.COM
Rescue Says: Best in an Only-Dog Home

Nick decided he wanted a dog—his first as an adult. He’d grown up with big dogs, so he went to a local Doberman rescue group to adopt. Since he didn’t have a dog already, they told him that he might be a good match for Maya, who needed an “only-dog home.”

I met Maya when Nick brought her to our Relaxing Rowdy Rovers class, which is for dog-aggressive dogs. Maya was highly aroused and very reactive. So reactive, in fact, that when she saw another dog, she would get so revved-up barking and lunging that she’d frequently whirl around and nip at Nick. He’d been bitten and bruised many times.

Shelter Says: Needs a Job

Scout’s profile at the shelter said that he “needed a job.” When Karen and Todd asked what that meant, they were told that he was a smart, energetic dog who needed an outlet for his energy. That sounded good to them—they enjoyed hiking on the weekends.

What they didn’t realize was that Scout needed that kind of outlet every day.

 Read the full article.

 

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