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Coffee Break: Signs of Progress

What signs of progress have you seen since you entered the animal welfare field? That was the question we asked you for this issue’s Coffee Break. In your answers, you spoke of increased public awareness, growing resource levels, passage of animal-friendly legislation, and more.

What signs of progress have you seen since you entered the animal welfare field? That was the question we asked you for this issue’s Coffee Break. In your answers, you spoke of increased public awareness, growing resource levels, passage of animal-friendly legislation, and more.

Chad Anderson/istockphoto.com

From intake to animal care to adoptions, great improvements have been made. I believe the progress has been made possible by improved communications among shelter staff, rescue groups, volunteers, and the public. Our enhanced ability to communicate with one another through the Internet, conferences, and publications has allowed us to learn and apply best practices at a much faster rate than we could have done 20 years ago. Being able to share information more effectively has allowed all of us in shelters to maximize our potential for growth, change, and progress.
Barbara S. Carr, Executive Director, SPCA Serving Erie County, Tonawanda, New York

I walk through the Sacramento SPCA’s new 20,000-square-foot adoption building and have to move out of the way as volunteers begin the daily morning ritual of walking the dogs available for adoption. Handsome, gray-faced Milo, a 10- year-old black Lab, seemingly skips past me on his way outside. He is followed by Tilda, a 9-year-old Chesapeake Bay retriever, and Rocky, an 8-year-old rottweiler mix. Cinnamon, an 11-year-old terrier, is scampering to catch up. In 1975, these dogs would have had no chance at all, but now, their prospects are good. More “senior” animals are adopted each year. In 2006, more than 800 older dogs and cats were placed in new loving homes at the Sacramento SPCA alone. We have come a long way in 30-plus years—and, for dogs like Milo, Tilda, Rocky, and Cinnamon, the change is literally a lifetime.
Rick Johnson, Executive Director, Sacramento SPCA, Sacramento, California

 Read the full article.

To see and respond to the latest Coffee Break question, check out www.animalsheltering.org/coffeebreak.

 

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