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Home Sweet Home

Two years after Katrina, Louisiana SPCA staff, full of dreams and uncertainty, open a new shelter.

Two years after Katrina, Louisiana SPCA staff, full of dreams and uncertainty, open a new shelter.

Jackson Hill Photography
While last August’s news coverage of the two-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina revealed far too many Gulf Coast residents still living on the streets or in crime-ridden FEMA trailer parks, at least one group at the center of the storm—the Louisiana SPCA—has found its way back home. The long-term fate of the New Orleans population (and levees) is still uncertain, but the animals of the Big Easy now have a place to take shelter—on Mardi Gras Boulevard, no less.

For the benefit of the three people in the animal sheltering field who were not somehow involved in post-Katrina rescue and reunion efforts—and for newcomers to the field—here’s a brief history of the Louisiana SPCA before and after the storm: Founded in the late 19th century, the society is the oldest animal welfare organization in Louisiana. It sheltered about 11,000 pets annually and performed adoptions, low-cost veterinary services, animal control, and other services for the city.

When Katrina came aground in August 2005 and the city of New Orleans flooded, shelter staff had already evacuated LA/SPCA animals to the Houston SPCA. But the organization’s Japonica Street facility did not survive the flood.

 Read the full article.

 

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