rescue. reunite. rehome. rethink.
  • Share to Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email
  • Print

Please Curb Your Volunteer

Problem volunteers. Find us the shelter that’s never had one—and bless those that have. But good volunteers provide the lifeblood of many an organization, and understanding your shelter’s culture and knowing who to accept into your program can help you prevent most conflicts.

Problem volunteers. Find us the shelter that’s never had one—and bless those that have. But good volunteers provide the lifeblood of many an organization, and understanding your shelter’s culture and knowing who to accept into your program can help you prevent most conflicts.

Collage: Bussolati
Imagine the most difficult animal you’ve ever had at your shelter.

Did she display aggression? Never obey? Upset daily shelter functions, make good workers quit, and cause the staff to wince every time they had to deal with her?

Forget dogs, cats, and those notoriously vicious bunnies. As most shelter folks know all too well, the most difficult animal to show up at most facilities is likely to be a human. It’s hard enough when the troublesome creature is an irritated member of the public, but when it’s someone working within your own walls, her crazy-making capacity can rise by leaps and bounds.

 Read the full article.

 

Powered by Convio
nonprofit software