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Bethany Wynn Adams

Bethany Wynn Adams is an editor at Animal Sheltering, a quarterly magazine for anyone who cares about the health and happiness of animals and their people, and animalsheltering.org. From tales of shelter mascots to guidance on backyard chickens, Bethany works with experts from across the country and within the Humane Society of the United States to bring wide-ranging, engaging print and web news to the animal welfare community. Winner of the Cat Writers' Association's MUSE Medallion, she lives in Maryland with her husband and two naughty rescue dogs.

Content by Bethany Wynn Adams

  • Magazine Article

    Working together works

    Retired president and CEO of Denver Dumb Friends League offers three parting words

    Bob Rohde was 23 when he joined Dumb Friends League as an animal care technician in 1973. (The Denver-based organization was founded in 1910, when the word “dumb” was widely used to refer to animals who can’t speak for themselves.)

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  • Magazine Article

    Weathering the storms, part IV

    Despite sustaining damage, the South Florida Wildlife Center opened immediately after Hurricane Irma.

    Learning Andrew’s lessons in Florida

    In 1992, Hurricane Andrew struck Florida just south of Miami. Although around 1.2 million residents evacuated in the face of the Category 5 storm, some stayed behind with their pets, knowing evacuation shelters wouldn’t accept them. Others returned home to find pets missing or crushed under the rubble.

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  • Magazine Article

    Peace, love, dogs

    To benefit animals, Louisiana humane society taps that ’60s spirit

    Folks in Covington, Louisiana, are feeling groovy on a yearly basis at St. Tammany Humane Society’s Woofstock festival. The free, one-day event is a nearly 30-year tradition that’s grown to include roughly 2,000 attendees, almost 40 sponsors, dog and human hippie costume contests, a DJ, collectible Woofstock T-shirts, local food and celebrities, children’s entertainment, raffles and, of course, beer.

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  • Magazine Article

    Not your mother’s animal shelter

    After decades of innovation, sheltering has progressed far beyond its ‘dog pound’ roots

    Some longtime animal welfare professionals can remember the days of tiny cinderblock shelters hidden away from the community, bare concrete kennels and unthinkable euthanasia rates. Decades later, shelters leading the field are innovative, creative community centers that tackle animal homelessness at the roots and boast vastly improved live-release rates. How did we get here—and where will we go next?

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  • Magazine Article

    Sheltering people and pets

    Safe Haven will help protect families of domestic violence survivors.

    The Jackson Galaxy Project and GreaterGood.org retrofit shelters for vulnerable families

    Violence against animals often portends violence against people, but for women experiencing domestic abuse, the two can be one and the same. Seventy-one percent of women who own pets and enter domestic violence shelters report that their abuser threatened, harmed or killed their pet as a form of psychological control—yet less than 3 percent of those shelters allow pets in the U.S.

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  • Magazine Article

    Ar-cat-ecture for animals

    "White Jack" by Abramson Teiger Architects: "The form allows the cat to climb through it like a habitat ... [it's] like a piece of interactive art where the cat becomes part of the art."

    Architects design community cat shelters for a cause

    If you were drawing a Venn diagram, you likely wouldn’t have “community cat shelter” and “iconic modernist design” overlap. Yet last October, the Herman Miller Showroom in Culver City, California—namesake of Herman Miller, the furniture manufacturer credited with instantly recognizable designs like the Eames lounge chair—showcased cat shelters designed, built and donated by local architects and designers.

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