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Jason Schipkowski

Jason Schipkowski is a Mentorship and Training Manager with Pets for Life (PFL) at The Humane Society of the United States. As part of this role, he provides training support throughout the country to organizations that desire to connect people in underserved communities to information and services for their pets. Prior to joining the PFL team, Jason worked for a rescue and shelter group in St. Louis, Missouri, where he helped to implement the PFL community outreach model and served as Marketing and Development Director. Jason has additional years of experience in marketing, communication, and companion animal medical care.

Content by Jason Schipkowski

  • Blog Post

    The rescue story: helpful fundraising message or harmful stereotype?

    An important story to tell is that a lack of access to pet services does not equate to a lack of love for a person’s companion.

    You don’t have to look far to see fairly angry language implying how generally cruel people are (hello Facebook!) Jason Schipkowski explains the importance of examining how and why we may be fanning those flames.

    It was 8 years ago when I got into animal welfare work, and I can remember the catalyst. I was at my neighborhood coffee joint when I saw it: a calendar for sale by a local rescue group. As I flipped through it, I was struck by wave after wave of pitiful before-and-after pictures—thin, crusty-skinned dogs juxtaposed with uplifting pictures of the same dogs beaming, furry and happy after rescue and rehab. I was moved to action and I signed up to help the group that had put out the calendar. Volunteering and donating turned into a marketing and development position within the organization.

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  • Blog Post

    There's a Flint, Michigan in your community

    Hear from Jason Schipkowski, Pets for Life mentorship and training coordinator for The HSUS, as he applies what’s happened with the water crisis in Flint to crises happening across the nation.

    The recent lead-contaminated water crisis in Flint, Michigan in and of itself is shameful, thrusting discussions of environmental classism and social injustice to the forefront of the media. During such publicized tragedies, the outcry against deceit and negligence can rise to replace decades of muted suffering, where blatant inequality and the impacts of systemic poverty either don’t show up on people’s radars or are largely misunderstood.

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