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Magazine Articles

  • Magazine Article

    Itty bitty kitty apprentices

    Animal professionals learn from Humane Society Silicon Valley kittens

    Web Exclusives

    It was so crazy it just might work: Around five years ago, Humane Society Silicon Valley in California decided to stop housing kittens in its nursery … so it could care for more kittens.

    “In-house, we had a whole fleet of volunteers who would come in and clean the babies and feed them and socialize them, but we had to turn kittens away from the program,” explains Christie Kamiya, the shelter’s chief of shelter medicine. At the time, HSSV housed around 400 kittens a year, but “we wanted to pretty much take any kitten that came through our doors.”

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  • Magazine Article

    High-tech pets

    Startups could make for happier pets and pet owners

    Web Exclusives

    When I see dogs outside pharmacies or grocery stores, tied to lampposts or sitting in cars with windows cracked, I feel conflicted. Dogs want to be with their pack at all times, and I love that after a long day at work, people want to bring them along on car trips and errands. People talk about mommy guilt, but dog mommy guilt is oh-so-real, and I get that.

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  • Magazine Article

    Population control ... without the snip

    Symposium to focus on nonsurgical contraception for cats and dogs

    Web Exclusives

    The quest continues for an affordable, widely available, nonsurgical alternative to traditional spay/neuter surgery for cats and dogs. Not surprisingly, advocates wish things would move a little faster.

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  • Magazine Article

    Tour of duty

    Service members are a force for good at Virginia shelter

    Web Exclusives

    Naval Station Norfolk in Virginia’s Hampton Roads region is the country’s largest naval installation, and it’s common to see young service members in the lobby of the Norfolk SPCA. Many are there to adopt or to bring their pets to the shelter’s veterinary clinic; others come to volunteer their time to help homeless animals.

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  • Magazine Article

    Love beyond borders

    Eileen Anderson, Heidi Leland, CHHS assistant manager Jodi Henkel, CHHS shelter manager Kaitlyn Moss and Caramel.

    Rescuer reunited with animals she cared for overseas

    Web Exclusives

    “I’ve been rescuing animals my whole life,” says Heidi Leland. When she and her husband decided in April 2016 to relocate to South Korea for his job, Leland knew she wanted to help rescue animals from the country’s dog meat trade.

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  • Magazine Article

    A pretty penny for your best thoughts

    Petco Foundation Innovation Showdown goes live in its second year

    Web Exclusives

    A cloud-based marketing resource for shelters and rescues, technological solutions to help reunite lost pets and owners, and an animal transport program that addresses the root causes of animal overpopulation—all three ideas have a shot at investment, thanks to the Petco Foundation Innovation Showdown during this year’s Animal Care Expo.

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  • Magazine Article

    Don’t buy into that doggie in the window

    Author Rory Kress and her dog, Izzie.

    In new book, journalist investigates the cruel, complicated puppy mill industry

    Web Exclusives

    Journalist, Emmy-winning television producer and author Rory Kress loves her Wheaton terrier, Izzie, and originally thought nothing of purchasing the USDA-licensed pup at a pet store. But a few years later and a few years wiser, Kress embarked on a yearlong, nationwide investigation into the origins of pet store dogs like her own.

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  • Magazine Article

    Room to breathe

    British veterinarians launch national campaign to reduce demand for—and improve the health of—‘smushed-face’ breeds

    Web Exclusives

    When people ask what life is like for a dog with brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome (BOAS), veterinarian Sean Wensley will sometimes hand them a plastic straw. “If you have to spend a few minutes breathing in and out through a narrow drinking straw, you quickly realize how difficult it is,” he says. “It’s quite unpleasant. Being in a constant state of oxygen deprivation is distressing.”

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  • Magazine Article

    Working together works

    Retired president and CEO of Denver Dumb Friends League offers three parting words

    Web Exclusives

    Bob Rohde was 23 when he joined Dumb Friends League as an animal care technician in 1973. (The Denver-based organization was founded in 1910, when the word “dumb” was widely used to refer to animals who can’t speak for themselves.)

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  • Magazine Article

    Sheltering people and pets

    Safe Haven will help protect families of domestic violence survivors.

    The Jackson Galaxy Project and GreaterGood.org retrofit shelters for vulnerable families

    Web Exclusives

    Violence against animals often portends violence against people, but for women experiencing domestic abuse, the two can be one and the same. Seventy-one percent of women who own pets and enter domestic violence shelters report that their abuser threatened, harmed or killed their pet as a form of psychological control—yet less than 3 percent of those shelters allow pets in the U.S.

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  • Magazine Article

    Ar-cat-ecture for animals

    "White Jack" by Abramson Teiger Architects: "The form allows the cat to climb through it like a habitat ... [it's] like a piece of interactive art where the cat becomes part of the art."

    Architects design community cat shelters for a cause

    Web Exclusives

    If you were drawing a Venn diagram, you likely wouldn’t have “community cat shelter” and “iconic modernist design” overlap. Yet last October, the Herman Miller Showroom in Culver City, California—namesake of Herman Miller, the furniture manufacturer credited with instantly recognizable designs like the Eames lounge chair—showcased cat shelters designed, built and donated by local architects and designers.

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  • Magazine Article

    A day in the life: Antonia Gardner

    Wildlife veterinarian bids farewell to the old year at the South Florida Wildlife Center

    Web Exclusives

    South Florida Wildlife Center (SFWC) in Fort Lauderdale may not rank as a New Year’s Eve hotspot, but for medical director and veterinarian Antonia Gardner, it’s a fitting place to pay tribute to “auld acquaintance” and to welcome new faces. The center, an HSUS affiliate, is open 365 days a year and takes in more than 12,000 animals annually. For SFWC’s dedicated staff and volunteers, this means a constant cycle of caring for the sick, injured or orphaned while saying farewell to the healthy and healed before they’re returned to their wild habitats.

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  • Magazine Article

    Animal Sheltering’s 2017 gift guide

    Holiday gifts for your favorite shelter and rescue humans

    Web Exclusives

    Americans love animals to the tune of 90 million dogs and 94 million cats in homes across the country, and yet many know very little about the daily work that animal control officers, veterinarians, volunteers, adoption counselors, community cat coordinators, kennel managers, behaviorists, shelter directors and humane educators do to help the people and animals in their communities.

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  • Magazine Article

    All Pawgwarts houses are equal

    Shelter director explains the power of magical thinking

    Web Exclusives

    When the Pet Alliance of Greater Orlando in Florida started “sorting” homeless dogs and cats by “Pawgwarts” house, rather than by breed, it led to an explosion of media coverage, shelter visitors and website traffic. But the Harry Potter-inspired idea isn’t just about sorting hats and spells: It’s a way to get people to stop and rethink what “breed” really means.

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  • Magazine Article

    Employee of the year

    ‘Genius’ new Maddie’s Fund app provides shelter-approved advice to adopters and fosters

    Web Exclusives

    You really should contact all of last week’s adopters and see how things are going—but, nevermind, your new assistant is taking care of it.

    Also, a foster volunteer needs instructions for bottle-feeding neonates, another is concerned about her foster dog’s loose stools, and the people who adopted the hound-poodle mix yesterday have some questions about housetraining—but no worries, your assistant is handling these, too. Your assistant never takes a holiday, is available 24/7 and gives spot-on advice. Best of all, your assistant works for free.

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  • Magazine Article

    Who wants to adopt a ‘Game of Thrones’ fan?

    Offbeat animal biographies humanize shelter pets

    Web Exclusives

    According to the Facebook page of Young-Williams Animal Center in Knoxville, Tennessee, Bootsy is a popular middle school cheerleader who loves Taylor Swift and hates rap. She’s also a black-and-white cat. “This cat and I are the same person,” deadpans a commenter, tagging a friend.

    That’s the point, says marketing manager Courtney Kliman: The creative Facebook and Instagram posts are designed not only to grab people’s attention, but also to make people see themselves in the adoptable animals.

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  • Magazine Article

    Minds over matters

    Paul learns how to hold his head still in a mock-up of the MRI receiver that will pick up signals from his brain.

    How functional MRI can identify animals’ anxieties and prevent problem behaviors

    Web Exclusives

    For the last six years, as part of our study of canine cognition, my colleagues and I at Emory University in Atlanta have been teaching dogs to lie still during MRI procedures without restraint or sedation.

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  • Magazine Article

    Disaster FAQ

    What shelters and rescues need to know about the Hurricanes Maria, Irma and Harvey, as well as the wildfires in Oregon and Montana.

    Web Exclusives

    What shelters and rescues need to know about the Hurricanes Maria, Irma and Harvey, as well as the wildfires in Oregon and Montana.

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  • Magazine Article

    Super trooper

    Colorado Mounted Rangers volunteer Dawn Havens didn't hesitate to choose Kara as her canine partner.

    Colorado K9 officer is busy busting stereotypes

    Web Exclusives

    A shorthaired, medium-sized pit bull-mix, Kara looked like a lot of the other dogs at the Canyon Lake Animal Shelter Society in Texas. Her history wasn’t unusual either: She was surrendered with her eight puppies by an owner who couldn’t care for them. But inside this average-looking dog with a sad but run-of-the-mill backstory was a natural high achiever—someone with the smarts, drive and focus to get a job done.

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  • Magazine Article

    A room with a view

    A Good Mews Animal Foundation resident checks out a chipmunk.

    Cage-free cat shelter and wildlife habitat peacefully coexist in Georgia

    Web Exclusives

    What do you get when you mix a cat shelter, a barren yard and eager volunteers with green thumbs? A wildlife habitat certified by the National Wildlife Federation—or, as community outreach chair Lisa Bass of Good Mews Animal Foundation in Marietta, Georgia, calls it, a “big-screen kitty TV.”

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  • Magazine Article

    Finders keepers

    Although it has a dedicated kitten nursery, Miami-Dade works to keep young kittens out of the shelter, where they’re at risk of contracting a disease.

    Florida shelter’s Milkman Program delivers care kits to kitten finders

    Web Exclusives

    “I’ve found a litter of kittens. Can you take them?”

    It’s the type of call your shelter likely receives multiple times a day during the height of kitten season—Good Samaritans stumble across a litter and look to you to provide a solution. That’s all well and good if your organization has the capacity to meet this need, but if you’re already swamped with tiny fluffballs who need a lot of care, these calls can fill you with a sense of panic or dread.

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  • Magazine Article

    Working-class cats

    Milly was placed at a small farm in Manassas, Virginia in April. "She patrols the crops and has made friends with the resident chickens!" says the Humane Rescue Alliance's Erin Robinson.

    Through an urban relocation program, a D.C. shelter finds places—and jobs—for its last-chance cats

    Web Exclusives

    “Enjoy the lovely Dupont Circle fountain amongst our furry city companions,” recommends the reviewer, awarding the “Dupont Circle Rat Sanctuary” five stars on Yelp. The sanctuary is a “wonderful place for 100% organic, free-range rats to frolic in a safe environment without predators,” says another, awarding it four stars, plus the extra-large rodents are “healthy strong riding stock,” a fellow Yelper adds.

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  • Magazine Article

    A day in the life: Susan Spaulding

    <b>Midnight</b> I’m just finishing up midnight feeding for 3-hour litters; kittens are fed by weight, not age, so different litters may be on different schedules. I feed and potty everyone, do a mini exam on kittens in a fragile new litter who are not thriving, and make a note to contact their sponsor group in the morning to provide updates.

    The National Kitten Coalition’s co-founder, instructor and director of neonatal programs shares a day in her life … during kitten season

    Web Exclusives

    My name is Susan Spaulding—for 25-plus years I have fostered neonatal orphaned kittens, as well as kittens needing specialized medical care. Neonates, ill and underage kittens are one of the most at-risk groups within the animal welfare system; as little as 10 years ago, the vast majority were euthanized because rescue groups and shelters had little knowledge of how to care for them.

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  • Magazine Article

    Baby love

    Kitten nurseries often specialize in caring for unweaned kittens (commonly referred to as “bottle babies” or “neonates”) who need to be hand fed.

    In its new kitten nursery manual, the National Kitten Coalition provides an in-depth look at innovative solutions for kittens who need extra time and care

    Web Exclusives

    For shelter workers and rescue volunteers around the country, spring can seem the cruelest season. That’s when kitten intakes typically peak.

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