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Award-winning Animal Sheltering magazine offers news from the field, hands-on tips and expert advice.

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  • Animal Sheltering magazine spring 2019 cover
  • ASM Winter 2018 Cover

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  • President's Note

    A word from us

    Seized in a 2009 dogfighting raid, Plum is Anne Sterling’s constant companion and a reminder of the lifesaving power of teamwork.

    In August 2009, the Humane Society of the United States and its in-state shelter partners assisted the Indiana Gaming Commission with the largest dogfighting raid in the state’s history. Law enforcement agents seized 109 dogs from three separate properties, one of which, in a remote wooded area, held over 80 dogs. Their owner had been breeding dogs for fighting since the late 1970s and lived several hours away; he apparently came to the property twice a week to give the dogs food and water.

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  • Back to Basics

    Baby got fat

    Staffers at the Humane Rescue Alliance in Washington, D.C., were stunned by “sweet, mellow” Symba’s 35-pound girth, noting that he was “bigger than a lion cub.”

    How shelters and rescues can treat and talk about obese pets

    As a million YouTube videos can attest, everyone loves tubby tabbies and pudgy pooches. But the flip side is that pet obesity poses serious health issues. Animal experts weigh in on how shelters can transform dogs and cats from fat to fit.

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  • Life Preservers

    Romping grounds

    Through playgroup programs, shelters are giving dogs a vital mental and physical break from kennel life.

    Doggy playgroups have a transformative effect on Ohio shelter

    As any trainer will tell you, a tired dog is a good dog. Through daily playgroups, an Ohio shelter is ensuring that there are lots of tired, good dogs for adopters to meet—and experiencing other benefits shelter staff never imagined.

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  • The Human Element

    Protecting the protectors

    Carol Misseldine of the Humane Society of the United States helps staff an emergency shelter for animals displaced by the 2018 wildfires in California.

    Safety protocols for rescues are critical—for both people and animals

    Responders tasked with saving animals from disasters and major cruelty cases make the animals their focus. But who’s protecting the protectors? Proper planning and training can improve the well-being of humans and animals alike.

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  • Unforgettable

    Her days in court

    Lilly Mae helps make court appearances less stressful for children in foster care.

    Rescue dog comforts children at foster care hearings

    Rescue dog Lilly Mae comforts Oregon children during their court appearances.

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  • Mouthpieces

    First, do no harm

    Download this Shareworthy to raise awareness of the correct ways to help baby wildlife

    Download this Shareworthy to raise awareness of the correct ways to help baby wildlife.

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Explore other Animal Sheltering magazine content

  • Magazine Article

    Dying without a sound

    HSUS investigation reveals dead rabbits in the freezer at Petland

    Web Exclusives

    A day after the HSUS released the results of its undercover investigation and two days after police searched the premises, Petland announced that it was cutting ties with the franchise store in Fairfax, Virginia, and removed its company name from the building. Acting on a tip from the HSUS, Fairfax police searched the store with a warrant on April 1 and found 31 dead rabbits and one dead dog in the freezer. They are investigating.

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  • Magazine Article

    A word from us

    Spring 2019

    In August 2009, the Humane Society of the United States and its in-state shelter partners assisted the Indiana Gaming Commission with the largest dogfighting raid in the state’s history. Law enforcement agents seized 109 dogs from three separate properties, one of which, in a remote wooded area, held over 80 dogs. Their owner had been breeding dogs for fighting since the late 1970s and lived several hours away; he apparently came to the property twice a week to give the dogs food and water.

    Read More

  • Magazine Article

    Up for the count

    Collaborative project aims to revolutionize the way communities count and care for cats

    Spring 2019

    As the first morning visitors to the National Zoo stroll through the entrance, two field technicians with backpacks head in the opposite direction, over Rock Creek, across a parkway carrying commuters into downtown Washington, D.C., and up a steep, muddy hillside.

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  • Magazine Article

    Where foster and hospice care meet

    Fospice programs help elderly, ill pets spend their final days surrounded by home comforts

    Spring 2019

    Christopher Frey's wife Liesl loved cats and often talked about her childhood pet, an all-black feline named Midnight. And so when Liesl, 44, was hospitalized with stage IV cancer last summer, Frey contacted the San Francisco SPCA to see if a volunteer could bring a cat to visit.

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  • Magazine Article

    Her cup of tea

    Artist promotes adoptions with portraits on tea bags

    Spring 2019

    How does she do it? And are those really tea bags?

    Those are among the typical first reactions to Didi Arias’ miniature paintings of shelter animals.

    The answers? Yes, they are actual tea bags, dried and emptied. And to work on such a tiny canvas, Arias makes sure she has good light, uses small paintbrushes and, of course, wears her glasses, filling in the details with ink pens.

    But Arias hopes her paintings inspire more than mere curiosity: She’d like her viewers to take to heart her message about the importance of shelter adoption.

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  • Magazine Article

    Classic programming, then and now

    Arizona’s longest-running local TV show turns 60

    Spring 2019

    If Pets on Parade were a person, it might be thinking about retirement. But luckily for the homeless pets served by the Arizona Humane Society, the state’s longest- running local television show isn’t even slowing down.

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