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Pet wellness

Very often what we see as neglect from pet owners is actually the result of their inability to access veterinary services and other pet wellness resources. For example, there may be a free, local spay/neuter clinic but it’s on the other side of town and transportation is a problem. Or the $400 dental cleaning simply isn’t affordable. Identify what obstacles are preventing people in your community from providing wellness care for their pets and present ways to overcome them in order to make sure people can keep their pets happy, healthy and in their homes.

Most recent Tools and Resources > Pet wellness

  • Blog Post

    Rethinking their final days

    What we do for our aging family members

    There’s not much that enrages animal lovers more than someone surrendering an elderly pet to a shelter. The stories, shared from one rescuer to another, are prime fodder for Facebook condemnation—that 9-year-old German shepherd purchased as a puppy; the 12-year-old cat who wandered onto the porch as a kitten; or perhaps the 3-year-old hamster the kids clamored for at the pet store. That pet no doubt gave her family the best years of her life, and this is how that devotion is repaid? Dumped at a shelter, scared and alone, left in the hands of strangers? What could be more cruel?

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  • Magazine Article

    Soup for skittish souls

    Coconut (left) was initially the most emotionally damaged dog from this Michigan puppy mill rescue, says the ASPCA’s Kristen Collins, but in 2013, she graduated from the nonprofit’s behavioral rehabilitation program with flying colors.

    Canine rehab research results in permanent facility and mentorship program

    In June 2010, the ASPCA assisted local authorities in Tennessee with a hoarding case, racing in the blistering heat to catch, assess and transport 100 dogs to partner shelters.

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  • Magazine Article

    Identifying and treating mouths full of hurt

    Cats won't open up and say "ah" when they've got a toothache.

    Cats with dental problems may be suffering in silence

    It wasn’t that long ago that we failed to understand pain in our companion animals. You may recall veterinarians in the past saying things like, “Animals don’t feel pain like we do.”

    In fact, when I went to veterinary school in the late-1980s, we weren’t taught to provide pain relievers for animals after common procedures such as spay/neuter or dental work, including extraction of teeth. Typically, our patients received short-acting pain medicine in the hospital, and then were sent home to rest and recover.

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