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Photo by Susan Guzy

Protect Cats

Cats still make up the majority of the animals euthanized in shelters, and of the 30-40 million community cats in the U.S., only about 2 percent are sterilized. We're promoting best practices and progressive strategies for supporting and managing community (feral and stray) cats, making shelter cats happier, and keeping cats in homes by a focus on behavior.

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Cats and public health

Get the facts about community cats and the risks to public health

Many animals, both wild and domesticated, can pass diseases to people. These are known as zoonotic diseases. Although we should be concerned about such diseases (like rabies, toxoplasmosis and more ), there are some common myths about the public health risks associated with community cats. In most cases, a compassionate coexistence between cats and humans can be established—and knowing how to prevent zoonotic disease is the best medicine.

Read Cats and public health

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  • Magazine Article

    Many happy returns

    For most healthy impounded stray cats, sterilizing, vaccinating, ear-tipping and returning them to where they were found is the best tactic.

    New manual will help guide your return-to-field program

    No single approach can solve all your community cat challenges, but return-to-field is often the place to start. A new handbook serves as a guide to providing positive outcomes for healthy outdoor cats.

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  • Magazine Article

    Don't cat-nap the kittens!

    Download this Shareworthy to educate the public on how to approach newborn kittens.

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  • Blog Post

    You too can launch a return-to-field program!

    New handbook covers how to do RTF from A-to-Z

    It was a sunny, blue sky morning when we set out from the shelter with a ginger cat stowed in the back of our SUV. A large towel covered his trap, pulled back at the ends to make sure he had enough air. Typical for ferals, he was completely silent—someone stepping into the car at that moment might not have even realized he was there. For my wife, Suzi, and me, our job was to get him home now that he was neutered and ear-tipped. I was concerned, though, because the information we were given about where he was trapped was hazy.

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