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Expo

Animal Care Expo is the annual conference hosted by The Humane Society of the United States for animal welfare professionals and volunteers, uniting animal care experts and newcomers from around the globe to learn lifesaving skills and strategies to increase adoptions, keep pets in homes, engage communities, humanely manage cat populations and much more.

  • Animal Care Expo

    Save the date to join us May 14-17, 2018 in Kansas City, Missouri! You'll network with more than 2,000 animal care experts, professionals and newbies from around the globe to learn new skills and strategies to find pets homes, keep pets in homes, engage your community, humanely manage community cat populations and more!

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Most recent Tools and Resources > Expo

  • Magazine Article

    The little clinic that could

    Veterinarian Kelly Pinkston performs a spay surgery at the Help for Animals clinic in West Virginia, which has sterilized more than 160,000 animals.

    Animal Care Expo legacy is still going strong at a West Virginia spay/neuter clinic

    As Donna Spencer tells it, one of her most life-altering experiences took place 22 years ago during a visit to Las Vegas.

    She didn’t win (or lose) a fortune at the casinos or get married at a drive-through chapel. What Spencer did in Vegas was even more meaningful, and it would impact countless lives in the years to come.

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  • Training/Event

    Animal Care Expo 2018

    The Humane Society of the United States

    Mark your calendars—Animal Care Expo is heading to Kansas City, Missouri, May 14-17, 2018. The full conference—which includes five meals!—costs just $275 when you register online. But register before March 16 to nab the even lower, Early Bird rate of $225—a $50 savings!

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  • Training/Event

    Animal Care Expo 2017 special session: Come on down ... the policy is right!

    Come on down … The policy is right! – Special Session, Animal Care Expo 2017

    Think legislation and other types of public policy aren't relevant to your lifesaving mission? Think again! Watch Animal Care Expo 2017's special session.

    Think legislation and other types of public policy aren't relevant to your lifesaving mission? Think again! When politicians take on issues like breed-specific legislation, hold times for cats, adoption regulations and access to veterinary care, your work may be directly affected, and not necessarily for the better. 

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  • Magazine Article

    Women’s movement

    Caroline Earle White (front row, left) poses with other founding members of the Women’s Humane Society (WHS) in 1913. WHS continues its tradition of female leadership today.

    Philadelphia shelter blazed trails with all-female leadership

    Nearly 50 years before some women were granted the right to vote, 30 women spearheaded the Women’s Branch of the Pennsylvania Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals—and 150 years later, women still drive the animal welfare field.

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  • Magazine Article

    How to get the most out of Animal Care Expo

    So does Sherbet.

    The senior director of volunteer engagement for The HSUS shares her best tips for effective networking at conferences

    Full disclosure: I hate networking. I’m not on LinkedIn, I loathe going into a room where I don’t really know someone and having to strike up a conversation (it’s so much like college: “What’s your major?”) and if “networking” is in the title of an event, I usually skip it. I know there are a million articles explaining both why networking is important and how to do it, but this is just how I am. I can’t help it.

    So, imagine my surprise when my colleague asked me to write a blog about it!

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  • Magazine Article

    Who runs the (animal welfare) world? Girls.

    Laura Maloney

    But what does that mean for our field?

    We chatted with Maloney and McFarland for this edited Q&A to preview of their workshop at Animal Care Expo 2017.

    The animal welfare world is predominantly female. Why do you think that is? How does that impact our work?

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