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Animal control and field services

Animal control officers and humane investigators have a shared mission of helping animals and bringing abusers to justice, which takes flexibility, compassion and courage. Learn best practices, new tools and techniques, and how animal care and control leaders can promote our work through positive interactions and collaboration with their communities. 

  • Making the case against animal cruelty

    The evidence couldn’t have been clearer, because the perpetrator videotaped his crimes on his phone. In one video, the man wraps his girlfriend’s cat in duct tape and taunts the animal. The other recording, dated three weeks later, shows the same man beating his girlfriend so badly she would end up in the hospital. (Fortunately, the cat and the woman survived.)

    Both videos were disturbing, says Chris Brosan, former manager of strategic campaigns and special projects at The HSUS. But only one of the crimes—the assault on the girlfriend—would appear in national crime statistics.

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Most recent Tools and Resources > Animal control and field services

  • Magazine Article

    Making the case against animal cruelty

    Animal control and humane law enforcement officers in some jurisdictions can now play a key role in developing a database of national and regional animal cruelty statistics.

    New manual helps officers report incidents to the FBI

    The evidence couldn’t have been clearer, because the perpetrator videotaped his crimes on his phone. In one video, the man wraps his girlfriend’s cat in duct tape and taunts the animal. The other recording, dated three weeks later, shows the same man beating his girlfriend so badly she would end up in the hospital. (Fortunately, the cat and the woman survived.)

    Both videos were disturbing, says Chris Brosan, former manager of strategic campaigns and special projects at The HSUS. But only one of the crimes—the assault on the girlfriend—would appear in national crime statistics.

    Read More

  • Magazine Article

    The dark side of the coop

    For shelters and rescues taking in chickens, the quest for backyard eggs isn’t all it’s cracked up to be

    "We have three chickens,” reads the email, one of many that routinely land in Mary Britton Clouse’s inbox. “Somehow they all got frostbitten when they were a couple months old. One is missing every claw, one is missing feet, and [one] is missing feet and shanks. We were wondering if you guys could take them in.”

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  • Magazine Article

    Finders keepers

    Although it has a dedicated kitten nursery, Miami-Dade works to keep young kittens out of the shelter, where they’re at risk of contracting a disease.

    Florida shelter’s Milkman Program delivers care kits to kitten finders

    “I’ve found a litter of kittens. Can you take them?”

    It’s the type of call your shelter likely receives multiple times a day during the height of kitten season—Good Samaritans stumble across a litter and look to you to provide a solution. That’s all well and good if your organization has the capacity to meet this need, but if you’re already swamped with tiny fluffballs who need a lot of care, these calls can fill you with a sense of panic or dread.

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  • Blog Post

    "I know what's best for your dog"

    The euthanasia of a dog she removed from a family is moment the author's evolution began.

    Ashley Mutch takes a tough look back at her journey from putting people in their place, to putting herself in theirs

    With a love for animals and with my criminal justice degree in hand, I began my career in animal welfare as a humane law enforcement officer. In my mind, it couldn’t get any better than this. I had such a drive, a pure desire to rescue animals. I would be the voice for the animals who couldn’t speak for themselves. I was empowered. I would find them, rescue them and get them into what I was sure were better, more loving homes.
     

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  • Blog Post

    Can you work bias-free in your community?

    Will the people you interact with spread the message that you are there to help?

    Guest blogger and animal control guru, Todd Stosuy, explains why reducing judgment can still result in a safe community, happy animals and satisfaction that problems have been solved.

    Over the course of more than 13 years in animal care and control, I have found that our profession has a history of being perceived as “the bad guys” in animal welfare. Perhaps these impressions have been created over the years through misunderstandings and miscommunication, but I believe that we haven’t done enough to positively engage our communities or collaborate with our fellow animal welfare professionals.
     

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  • Store Product

    Don't Leave Your Pet in a Parked Car: 500 Flyers

    Package of 500 Flyers

    On a warm day, the temperature in a car can exceed 120 degrees in a matter of minutes, even with the windows partially open.  This flyer informs the public of dangers pets face when left in alone in a parked car, from heat stress to risk of theft.  

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