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Animal control and field services

Animal control officers and humane investigators have a shared mission of helping animals and bringing abusers to justice, which takes flexibility, compassion and courage. Learn best practices, new tools and techniques, and how animal care and control leaders can promote our work through positive interactions and collaboration with their communities. 

  • Making the case against animal cruelty

    The evidence couldn’t have been clearer, because the perpetrator videotaped his crimes on his phone. In one video, the man wraps his girlfriend’s cat in duct tape and taunts the animal. The other recording, dated three weeks later, shows the same man beating his girlfriend so badly she would end up in the hospital. (Fortunately, the cat and the woman survived.)

    Both videos were disturbing, says Chris Brosan, former manager of strategic campaigns and special projects at The HSUS. But only one of the crimes—the assault on the girlfriend—would appear in national crime statistics.

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Most recent Tools and Resources > Animal control and field services

  • Magazine Article

    The right response to wildlife calls

    This is the second in a series of three blogs showcasing how our Wild Neighbors partners have implemented one of the criteria of our Wild Neighbors pledge.

    “I need a trap for this raccoon so he’ll stay out of my trash cans!”

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  • Magazine Article

    Making the case against animal cruelty

    Animal control and humane law enforcement officers in some jurisdictions can now play a key role in developing a database of national and regional animal cruelty statistics.

    New manual helps officers report incidents to the FBI

    The evidence couldn’t have been clearer, because the perpetrator videotaped his crimes on his phone. In one video, the man wraps his girlfriend’s cat in duct tape and taunts the animal. The other recording, dated three weeks later, shows the same man beating his girlfriend so badly she would end up in the hospital. (Fortunately, the cat and the woman survived.)

    Both videos were disturbing, says Chris Brosan, former manager of strategic campaigns and special projects at The HSUS. But only one of the crimes—the assault on the girlfriend—would appear in national crime statistics.

    Read More

  • Magazine Article

    The dark side of the coop

    For shelters and rescues taking in chickens, the quest for backyard eggs isn’t all it’s cracked up to be

    "We have three chickens,” reads the email, one of many that routinely land in Mary Britton Clouse’s inbox. “Somehow they all got frostbitten when they were a couple months old. One is missing every claw, one is missing feet, and [one] is missing feet and shanks. We were wondering if you guys could take them in.”

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