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Compassion fatigue

Compassion fatigue is real, and the stress of animal welfare work can negatively affect morale and job performance and ultimately lead to high staff turnover. Here you'll find resources to help you support your team and strengthen your compassion resilience.

  • Got compassion fatigue?

    Before coming to The HSUS over five years ago, I spent about 11 years working in two different shelters in Washington state, where I live. I wore about fifty different hats, managing volunteer programs, foster care, outreach and education programs, and doing just about every shelter task there is, from intakes to adoptions, and from cleaning cages to euthanasia. Being a “shelter person” wasn’t just a job for me; it was my identity. It was hard, it was often frustrating and even heartbreaking, but it was all I wanted to do.

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Most recent Tools and Resources > Compassion fatigue

  • Magazine Article

    Animal Sheltering’s 2017 gift guide

    Holiday gifts for your favorite shelter and rescue humans

    Americans love animals to the tune of 90 million dogs and 94 million cats in homes across the country, and yet many know very little about the daily work that animal control officers, veterinarians, volunteers, adoption counselors, community cat coordinators, kennel managers, behaviorists, shelter directors and humane educators do to help the people and animals in their communities.

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  • Blog Post

    Got compassion fatigue?

    Sleepy pup

    Animal protection work is really, really hard. Discover how to take better care of yourself, so that you can take better care of the animals in your care.

    Before coming to The HSUS over five years ago, I spent about 11 years working in two different shelters in Washington state, where I live. I wore about fifty different hats, managing volunteer programs, foster care, outreach and education programs, and doing just about every shelter task there is, from intakes to adoptions, and from cleaning cages to euthanasia. Being a “shelter person” wasn’t just a job for me; it was my identity. It was hard, it was often frustrating and even heartbreaking, but it was all I wanted to do.

    Read More

  • Magazine Article

    Get (customer) smart

    Guide teaches shelter staff to interact effectively with people

    “The customer is always right.”

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