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Managing community cats

“Community cats” are typically un-owned or semi-owned cats, comprised of both strays (lost and abandoned former pets who may be suitable for home environments) and ferals (extremely fearful of people and not welcoming of human attention, making them unsuitable for home environments), who are the offspring of other feral or stray cats. Some community cats can be considered loosely owned, meaning that concerned residents feed them and may provide some form of shelter in their own homes or on their own property, but do not always identify the cats as their own personal pets.

  • Returning healthy feral cats

    Communities around the country are increasingly using TNR as the preferred method of cat control. Here, we examine the best medical practices for TNR, starting from the moment of capture through the time of release. Some of these steps will likely be performed by trappers and caregivers, others by the veterinarians performing the examinations, vaccinations, and surgeries.

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  • Managing Community Cats: A Guide for Municipal Leaders

    Focused on what local leaders want and need to know, this guide offers an in-depth look at community cat management programs. It offers proactive approaches and collaborative efforts that local communities can use to humanely reduce the unowned cat population.

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Most recent Tools and Resources > Managing community cats

  • Blog Post

    State of the Mewnion

    Survey seeks info on effective work for community cats

    "As a people we have played a large part in the world, and we are bent upon making our future even larger than the past."

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  • Magazine Article

    Born free-roaming

    A cat from Baltimore’s Cherry Hill neighborhood awaits surgery.

    Return-to-field programs reassess ‘the right thing’ for community cats

    Until recently, Miami-Dade County Animal Services in Florida was drowning in cats and burdened with low live-release rates. Yet today, the shelter is achieving largely positive outcomes. The turnaround can be traced to a commonsense change in policy: The shelter now vets and returns the majority of cats it receives. Learn why the return-to-field approach is sometimes the most logical and humane strategy for overburdened shelters.

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  • Magazine Article

    All hands on deck in Virginia

    Caitlyn McIntosh checks out a newly captured kitten at Naval Station Norfolk. Military regulations prohibit trap-neuter-return, so McIntosh is leading a joint military-civilian effort to sterilize and rehome the estimated 100 cats and kittens living on the base.

    Sailors and civilians join forces to help cats at naval station

    The September 11th National Day of Service and Remembrance was established to honor the victims of a national tragedy through acts of service that foster a spirit of unity and compassion. One such charitable act took place this past Sept. 11, when an active-duty member of the Navy transported two feral cats to their new home at the Bluemont, Virginia, Boulder Crest Retreat, a nonprofit wellness center for military members and veterans.

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  • Blog Post

    "Cat Wars"? Let's call a ceasefire

    Survey after survey have shown that the public favors non-lethal strategies to address free-roaming cat populations

    Beyond the hyperbole in a book that's causing hisses

    Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock for the past week (or taking a break from social media), you’ve likely seen articles, blogs and reviews on the book Cat Wars: The Devastating Consequences of a Cuddly Killer by Dr. Peter Marra and Chris Santella, released this week. While the book is aggressive in its anti-Trap/Neuter/Return (TNR) and anti-free-roaming cat rhetoric, it is, unfortunately, nothing new.

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  • Magazine Article

    Out of the lions’ den

    California shelter transforms kittens who roar into ones who purr

    A California shelter tames feral kittens.

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  • Training/Event

    Trap/Neuter/Return- How to Manage a Community Cat Colony

    The Humane Society of the United States

    You can transform your knowledge of TNR from zero to hero at your own pace and in your own home! Brought to you by experts from Neighborhood Cats and The HSUS, this course is geared towards caregivers and folks new to the world of humane cat management.

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