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Statistics and data

Effecting long-term change requires information. Pet adoption and community data is necessary for accountability, public image, fundraising and program evaluation and planning. Data collection requires staff training, knowing what information to gather, making sure the data is clean and knowing how to turn that data into action. You can—and should—put numbers to work for you.

  • Crunching the numbers

    Last year, the Maryland SPCA faced a 10-pound challenge named Lilly. The newly arrived cat was stressed out and aggressive with shelter workers. After nearly three weeks, her behavior showed no improvement, and her chance at adoption was slipping away.

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  • What’s data got to do with it?

    Have you ever sat down and just looked at animal flow for your organization? You know, really just dug into it, looking at intakes, outcomes, adoption, euthanasia, length of stay and any of the other myriad of numbers an organization can produce? This is data that can feel tedious to collect month after month, but it can be so valuable. You can use it as a powerful tool to do anything, from staffing your adoption center appropriately to knowing how many foster volunteers you need to recruit. 

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Most recent Tools and Resources > Statistics and data

  • Magazine Article

    Employee of the year

    ‘Genius’ new Maddie’s Fund app provides shelter-approved advice to adopters and fosters

    You really should contact all of last week’s adopters and see how things are going—but, nevermind, your new assistant is taking care of it.

    Also, a foster volunteer needs instructions for bottle-feeding neonates, another is concerned about her foster dog’s loose stools, and the people who adopted the hound-poodle mix yesterday have some questions about housetraining—but no worries, your assistant is handling these, too. Your assistant never takes a holiday, is available 24/7 and gives spot-on advice. Best of all, your assistant works for free.

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  • Magazine Article

    Crunching the numbers

    Faunalytics founder Che Green explains how data can boost shelters’ effectiveness

    Last year, the Maryland SPCA faced a 10-pound challenge named Lilly. The newly arrived cat was stressed out and aggressive with shelter workers. After nearly three weeks, her behavior showed no improvement, and her chance at adoption was slipping away.

    Read More

  • Magazine Article

    Count your organization in

    Shelter Animals Count asks organizations to report monthly information, like beginning and ending animal counts, intake types and outcomes. The project allows shelters to opt out of publicly sharing data but encourages transparency.

    Collaboration among major animal welfare organizations aims to standardize and share shelter and rescue statistics

    Animal welfare organizations have long attempted to get a grasp on national shelter and rescue statistics, but the task proved too large for one organization alone.

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