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TNR and community cats

“Community cats” are typically un-owned or semi-owned cats, comprised of both strays (lost and abandoned former pets who may be suitable for home environments) and ferals (extremely fearful of people and not welcoming of human attention, making them unsuitable for home environments), who are the offspring of other feral or stray cats. Some community cats can be considered loosely owned, meaning that concerned residents feed them and may provide some form of shelter in their own homes or on their own property, but do not always identify the cats as their own personal pets.

  • We've come a long way, kitty

    Sixteen years ago, Alley Cat Allies launched National Feral Cat Day to promote trap-neuter-return and recognize the myriad people who were caring for feral cats across the country. That was also the year I did my first trap-neuter-return (TNR), of a mom cat who lived in the backyards on my block. Although I wasn’t feeding her, she was clearly content, well-fed and reproducing.

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  • Managing Community Cats: A Guide for Municipal Leaders

    Focused on what local leaders want and need to know, this guide offers an in-depth look at community cat management programs. It offers proactive approaches and collaborative efforts that local communities can use to humanely reduce the unowned cat population.

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Most recent Tools and Resources > TNR and community cats

  • Blog Post

    State of the Mewnion

    Survey seeks info on effective work for community cats

    "As a people we have played a large part in the world, and we are bent upon making our future even larger than the past."

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  • Blog Post

    We've come a long way, kitty

    The TNR approach has resulted in so much progress that our friends at Alley Cat Allies have rechristened their annual holiday Global Cat Day.

    Sixteen years ago, Alley Cat Allies launched National Feral Cat Day to promote trap-neuter-return and recognize the myriad people who were caring for feral cats across the country. That was also the year I did my first trap-neuter-return (TNR), of a mom cat who lived in the backyards on my block. Although I wasn’t feeding her, she was clearly content, well-fed and reproducing.

    Read More

  • Blog Post

    Finding sanctuary

    Can sanctuaries be a tool in our cat toolbox? An expert shares five top tips.

    From the outside looking in, managing the Lanai Cat Sanctuary sure looks easy. Erect a fence, construct some shelter, landscape, open the doors and call it kitty paradise. Not a month goes by that someone doesn’t ask me: “How do you set one up? I want to do this in my community.” The truth is that animal sheltering is complex, costly and requires expertise in a wide spectrum of disciplines including shelter and herd health management and medicine, nonprofit leadership, fundraising and animal welfare. It’s not as easy as it looks.

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  • Magazine Article

    Reconcilable differences

    By piecing together their expertise, community cat advocates and conservationists can maximize the effectiveness of trap-neuter-return (TNR) programs.

    Wildlife biologist helps chart a new path for cat advocates and conservationists

    The work of protecting animals is always challenging, but it becomes even thornier when the interests of different species seem to be in conflict. Such scenarios aren’t limited to cats and wildlife, but as trap-neuter-return (TNR) programs have become more common, community cats have taken center stage in the animals vs. animals debate.

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  • Training/Event

    Combating the Naysayers: Who Says There’s No Proof TNR Works?

    The Humane Society of the United States

    Due to the oft-repeated claims of trap-neuter-return opponents, it has almost become a truism “there’s no proof TNR works.” In fact, there is a wealth of published, peer-reviewed research that demonstrates TNR results in intake and euthanasia decline, nuisance abatement and population reduction, while attempts at eradication are largely futile. This webinar will review relevant scientific literature and also see what conclusions can be drawn about how to most effectively practice TNR.

    Presenters:

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  • Training/Event

    Smart TNR: Tracking success to achieve key goals

    The Humane Society of the United States

    How can you declare victory without having a clear goal? What about protecting against mission drift with the many competing issues we all juggle at the same time? This webinar will outline key, measurable goals and the metrics and outcomes that will benchmark your work to manage community cat populations and help you show success.

    Presenters:

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