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Animal Sheltering magazine

A magazine for anyone who cares about the health and happiness of animals and people in their community, Animal Sheltering goes beyond the four walls of shelters and rescues to look at the broader picture of the state of pets in the U.S. We cover stories that inform and entertain, empowering and inspiring you in your daily work. From those working to save more animals’ lives at the shelter to those helping prevent pets from being there in the first place, we’re covering the people and organizations that are making a difference. Read us, share with us, talk to us. Together, we’re changing the story.

Find Recent Articles

  • Animal Sheltering Magazine January/February 2016
  • Animal Sheltering magazine November/December 2015
  • Animal Sheltering Magazine September/October 2015

Scoop

  • President's Note

    Moving Animals—in the Right Direction

    The long-distance transport of rescued animals—from state to state and even from far-away countries—has long given animals in trouble a second chance. The gale-force winds of Hurricane Katrina and the massive rescue work it inspired produced a nationwide diaspora of Gulf Coast animals. The shelters in Louisiana and Mississippi were either submerged or full, and long-distance transport was the only way to save lives.

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  • 101 Department

    Forget the Fairy Tale

    Lowering your drawbridge will help more adopters and animals live happily ever after

    Almost two years ago, I set out to adopt a Chihuahua from a rescue group that prides itself on finding “carefully screened forever homes.”

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  • Rescue Central

    Rethinking Returns

    Repurposing a shelter management tool to control the flow of animals who come back

    It’s a scenario longtime rescuers have nightmares about, and yet we rarely see it coming: One day, seemingly out of the blue, you get the email message: “URGENT! I need to return Fido to you this weekend!”

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  • Shelter Medicine

    Making the Shelter a Happier Place for Animals

    Practical tips on how to help the animals in your care feel good

    Read the first of Dr. Griffin’s columns on emotional wellness in the Sep-Oct 2015 issue of Animal Sheltering.

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  • Unforgettable

    Marvelous Mervin

    Toothless Mervin gets thousands of "likes" on Instagram and even more love from his family.

    The first time I saw Mervin, he was burrowed under a blanket with just his little head sticking out, barking (or yelling, as I like to call it), at nothing in particular. He clearly had a lot to say. I could feel that there was something special about this little guy.

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Explore other Animal Sheltering magazine content

  • Magazine Article

    Marvelous Mervin

    Mervin fits right in with Joey Teixeira.

    Toothless Mervin gets thousands of "likes" on Instagram and even more love from his family.

    January/February 2016

    The first time I saw Mervin, he was burrowed under a blanket with just his little head sticking out, barking (or yelling, as I like to call it), at nothing in particular. He clearly had a lot to say. I could feel that there was something special about this little guy.

    Read More

  • Magazine Article

    Worth Every Scent

    In Kentucky, working cats Vincent and Van Gogh adjust to their new surroundings, during their holding period, in a dog crate that contains a feral den in which to hide.

    Working cats send rats packing

    November/December 2013

    Back in the late 1990s, Carl Jones, maintenance manager at the Los Angeles Flower Mart, frequently heard screams from vendors and customers. It usually meant they’d spotted rats, searching the aisles for tasty carnation seeds. Staff had tried for decades to get rid of the rats, but in 1999, after just two months, four cats succeeded where they had failed.

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  • Magazine Article

    Yes, In Our Backyard

    Nikki Holladay, a staff member with Indianapolis Animal Care and Control, prepares food and water for the colony of feral cats who live on the shelter's grounds.

    Turning the NIMBY attitude on its head, some shelters care for feral cat colonies onsite

    January/February 2013

    A decade ago, Lisa Tudor, executive director of IndyFeral, never imagined that she’d one day be working with Indianapolis Animal Care & Control to help save the feral cats who live around the municipal shelter.

    Her nonprofit group “had been doing TNR in the city, and we knew that there had been cats on the [shelter’s] property forever,” says Tudor. “We had tried before [to get permission to TNR the cats], but it never went anywhere.”

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  • Magazine Article

    Your Kitten, Should You Choose to Accept It

    January/February 2013

    In October, Asheville Humane Society staff realized they were facing the proverbial "feline cliff": 105 cats and kittens who had been in foster care over the course of kitten season were about to come back for adoption. But the North Carolina shelter already had 75 cats and kittens in the facility.

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  • Magazine Article

    Worth Every Scent

    Working cats send rats packing

    November/December 2013

    by Nancy Peterson

    Back in the late 1990s, Carl Jones, maintenance manager at the Los Angeles Flower Mart, frequently heard screams from vendors and customers. It usually meant they’d spotted rats, searching the aisles for tasty carnation seeds. Staff had tried for decades to get rid of the rats, but in 1999, after just two months, four cats succeeded where they had failed.

    Read More

  • Magazine Article

    A Tale of Two Cities

    For every life saved, staff at Stockton Animal Services add a marble to a jar at the front desk. Since partnering wiht the San Francisco SPCA, the shelter has been able to stockpile more marbles than staff thought possible.

    Mentorship helps struggling shelter mount massive turnaround

    November/December 2014

    Things were sunny in San Francisco in 2011. Maybe not in the literal sense, thanks to its legendary fog, but at the San Francisco SPCA (SFSPCA), the outlook for the city’s animals was bright.

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