Skip to content Skip to navigation

Help pets in hot cars

Learn how to help a pet left in a hot car this summer

Read More

Stephan Stockinger

  • Feature Article

    Off the market

    Changing the future for dogs in South Korea

    Despite shifting attitudes, dog farms - where dogs are slaughtered and sold for meat - remain in South Korea.

    Read the full article here

  • Feature Article

    When animal rescue isn't

    Some groups that claim to be helping animals are actually hurting them

    "Rescue hoarders" are often unable to recognize their limitations and unable to let go of the animals in their care.

    Read the full article here

Animal Sheltering

Magazine - Summer 2018

Fostering progress in animal welfare

The Humane Society of the United States’ Animal Sheltering works to create a world where people and animals thrive, living happy, healthy lives together by focusing on key areas of impact:

Addressing solvable behavior, pet care issues and housing-related problems to Keep Pets in Homes. Striving to Protect Cats by promoting innovative tools for managing cats wherever they live.

Reaching Underserved Communities by increasing access to pet care and wellness services and information.

And working to Increase Adoptions for pets already in shelters and rescue groups.

From Animal Sheltering magazine Summer 2018

There’s a long flight ahead for these dogs leaving Seoul, but they’ll find kindness—and new homes—at the end of it.
HSI’s Adam Parascandola carries a dog out of the bitter cold.
Athena left the dog farm in South Korea and flew to the States, landing in the care of the Humane Animal Welfare Society of Waukesha County just in time to give birth.

It’s still dark, the coming dawn a wash of paler blue in the inky sky over Namyangju, a small city outside of Seoul, when the line of vans turns off the main highway onto a gravel side road. The vans ascend the narrow drive up a brushy, frozen hillside, assembling above a cluster of ramshackle metal and tarp hangars.

About the Author

M. Carrie Allan is the senior editorial director at The Humane Society of the United States, served as editor of Animal Sheltering magazine for nearly a decade, and has focused on telling the stories of the animal protection movement for even longer. She holds a master’s degree in English and writing and has won awards for her journalism, fiction and poetry, including recognition from the Dog Writer’s Association of American, the Cat Writer’s Association, the Association of Food Journalists, and the James Beard Foundation (where she was a finalist for the work she does in her side-gig, writing about booze and cocktails for the Washington Post). If you think there’s a connection between her longtime commitment to animal welfare work and her interest in a good drink . . . well, aren’t you the smart one?

Pages

Tools and resources

  • Magazine Article

    Scrap the trap

    <em>Animal Sheltering</em> magazine Summer 2018

    Download this Mouthpiece to let your community know there are better ways to handle wildlife conflicts

    Download this Mouthpiece to let your community know that there are better ways to handle wildlife conflicts.

    Browse additional Mouthpieces designed to aid your community outreach. To submit a PSA your organization designed, contact us at asm@humanesociety.org.

    Read More

  • Magazine Article

    Population control ... without the snip

    Symposium to focus on nonsurgical contraception for cats and dogs

    The quest continues for an affordable, widely available, nonsurgical alternative to traditional spay/neuter surgery for cats and dogs. Not surprisingly, advocates wish things would move a little faster.

    Read More

  • Magazine Article

    Tour of duty

    Service members are a force for good at Virginia shelter

    Naval Station Norfolk in Virginia’s Hampton Roads region is the country’s largest naval installation, and it’s common to see young service members in the lobby of the Norfolk SPCA. Many are there to adopt or to bring their pets to the shelter’s veterinary clinic; others come to volunteer their time to help homeless animals.

    Read More

  • Store Product

    Cats, Wildlife and You Brochure: 500 Brochures

    Cats, wildlife and you cover

    Conflict between outdoor cats and native wildlife can be a dilemma for those who care about all animals. This brochure helps people prevent and resolve conflicts in their own backyards with easy to apply tips and tactics to keep both cats and wildlife safe. A great handout for animal shelters, wildlife rehab centers, and veterinary clinics.

    Read More

  • Store Product

    Cats, Wildlife and You Brochure: 100 Brochures

    Cats, wildlife and you cover

    Conflict between outdoor cats and native wildlife can be a dilemma for those who care about all animals. This brochure helps people prevent and resolve conflicts in their own backyards with easy to apply tips and tactics to keep both cats and wildlife safe. A great handout for animal shelters, wildlife rehab centers, and veterinary clinics.

    Read More

  • Magazine Article

    Powerful partnerships

    David Stroud with the Cashiers-Highlands Humane Society in North Carolina removes pups from a breeding mill several hours from his shelter. Many shelter and rescue partners cross county or state lines to assist in large rescues.

    Network connects shelters in need with critical resources

    It started with a run-of-the-mill barking complaint. But when officers with Habersham County (Georgia) Department of Animal Care & Control arrived at the property in April 2017, they discovered one of the state’s largest puppy mill operations.

    More than 350 animals were living on the property, and not just dogs. There were cats, donkeys, pigs, chickens, ducks, doves, an alpaca and a horse, all in deplorable conditions. Many of the dogs were confined to plastic tubs and under wire mesh, surrounded by mud and feces.

    Read More