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Planting the seeds of TNR

Empowering everyday people to tackle the community cat challenge

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  • Feature Article

    How far can fostering go?

    A new vision for sheltering is trending—and being tested—around the country

    Recognizing that most animals do best in a home environment, shelters are testing the limits of high-volume foster care programs and teaching other shelters to ramp up their efforts to get more animals into foster homes. Could the future of sheltering be all around us?

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  • Feature Article

    Nurturing the roots of TNR

    With a small investment, shelters can empower everyday people to tackle the community cat challenge

    If your shelter doesn’t have a trap-neuter-return program, you may think you have little to offer the people who call about unowned cats in their backyards and neighborhoods. But there are many ways shelters can facilitate today’s TNR and plant the seeds of tomorrow’s high-impact programs without spending a dime.

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Animal Sheltering

Magazine - Fall 2019

From Animal Sheltering magazine Summer 2018

There’s a long flight ahead for these dogs leaving Seoul, but they’ll find kindness—and new homes—at the end of it.
HSI’s Adam Parascandola carries a dog out of the bitter cold.
Athena left the dog farm in South Korea and flew to the States, landing in the care of the Humane Animal Welfare Society of Waukesha County just in time to give birth.

It’s still dark, the coming dawn a wash of paler blue in the inky sky over Namyangju, a small city outside of Seoul, when the line of vans turns off the main highway onto a gravel side road. The vans ascend the narrow drive up a brushy, frozen hillside, assembling above a cluster of ramshackle metal and tarp hangars.

About the Author

M. Carrie Allan is the senior editorial director at The Humane Society of the United States, served as editor of Animal Sheltering magazine for nearly a decade, and has focused on telling the stories of the animal protection movement for even longer. She holds a master’s degree in English and writing and has won awards for her journalism, fiction and poetry, including recognition from the Dog Writer’s Association of American, the Cat Writer’s Association, the Association of Food Journalists, and the James Beard Foundation (where she was a finalist for the work she does in her side-gig, writing about booze and cocktails for the Washington Post). If you think there’s a connection between her longtime commitment to animal welfare work and her interest in a good drink . . . well, aren’t you the smart one?

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  • Magazine Article

    A can-do catman

    The American Museum of the House Cat has attracted over 18,000 visitors.

    This stubborn, spry retiree forgoes cruises and even sleep, preferring to run a shelter and a cat museum

    At a time of life when most people are savoring a more leisurely pace, Harold Sims of Cullowhee, North Carolina, is busier than ever and has no intention of slowing down.

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  • Magazine Article

    A word from us

    Lindsay Hamrick gets a greeting from a puppy rescued from an unlicensed breeder in New Hampshire.

    I came to the Humane Society of the United States in 2014 after a decade (more if you count those years I spent as a kid sitting in cat rooms and walking dogs way too big for me) overseeing operations at animal shelters. I wouldn’t say I was particularly excited about or motivated to fit policy into my daily workload of caring for homeless pets—until I worked for an animal shelter that was located in a city with breed-specific legislation, flawed policies that ban certain types of dogs based on their physical appearance.

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  • Magazine Article

    Life beyond the laboratory

    With lots of love from parents Dave Rubello and Greta Guest, Teddy is finally living the life he deserves.

    Michigan dogs blossom following release from testing facility

    To see Teddy and Millie now—playful and friendly, outgoing and affectionate— you’d never guess what they’ve endured in their short lives. As part of an unnecessary test commissioned by Dow AgroSciences (now Corteva Agriscience), the beagles were force-fed a pesticide every day for more than seven months at a laboratory in Michigan.

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