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Stopping puppy mills

The majority of pet stores that sell puppies are getting those dogs from puppy mills, where mother dogs spend their entire lives in cramped cages or kennels with little or no personal attention. When the mother and father dogs can no longer breed, they are discarded or killed. Due to poor sanitation and a lack of preventive veterinary care, the puppies from puppy mills are often sick. Help us fight this industry.

  • Don’t buy into puppy mills!

    In the spring of 2000, I got a little teacup Yorkie named Delilah. She had been a breeding dog in a Dallas, Texas-area puppy mill, and at 8 years old, she was emaciated, and had lost all but two of her teeth.

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  • New route to adoption

    All of the puppies loaded onto the transport truck in Bowling Green were headed on journeys, leaving Kentucky to find new homes. The April 2014 transport would take them from the South, where puppies are plentiful, to rescues in the Northeast, where higher spay/neuter rates prevail.

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Most recent Tools and Resources > Stopping puppy mills

  • Magazine Article

    Disappearing act

    USDA removes vital information for combating puppy mills and other abusive industries

    At 11 a.m. on Feb. 3, Amanda Gossom of The HSUS’s puppy mills campaign was doing a routine part of her job, researching online inspection records for USDA-licensed dog breeders, when suddenly she hit a wall.

    She’d typed in the next breeder’s name and clicked search, expecting the usual information. Instead, she got an error message.

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  • Blog Post

    Don’t buy into puppy mills!

    An important reminder for our communities as we approach the holiday shopping season

    In the spring of 2000, I got a little teacup Yorkie named Delilah. She had been a breeding dog in a Dallas, Texas-area puppy mill, and at 8 years old, she was emaciated, and had lost all but two of her teeth.

    Read More

  • Magazine Article

    The boys who cried woof

    Young activists push to shut down state's puppy mills

    When the DePasquale family decided to adopt a sweet puppy mill refugee named Franklin, they had no idea he would take them all the way to the state capitol.

    By the time brothers Joey (age 13) and Anthony (age 12) DePasquale of York County met the little bichon mix, they already knew about Pennsylvania’s status as one of the most notorious puppy mill states in the East. “Our mom started showing us what was going on, and we just immediately realized that it was wrong and we wanted to help,” Joey recalls.

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  • Magazine Article

    To market, to market, to buy a sick dog

    An HSUS investigation finds puppy mills selling at unexpected venues

    DUST SWIRLS AT OUR FEET AS WE WALK ROW after row of the sweltering Canton, Texas, flea market, visiting shacks and stalls and little trailers where scores of people—ranging from families to professional breeders who’ve traveled hundreds of miles—are selling dogs.

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  • Magazine Article

    Anatomy of a puppy mill raid

    The details are depressingly similar—sick, suffering dogs languishing in row after row of wire cages—but closing each puppy mill down is a struggle all its own for The HSUS and its partners.

    Many shelter and animal rescue staff have seen firsthand the scenes of filth and neglect at puppy mills: the cramped, dark pens housing terrified animals; the lack of food, fresh water, or veterinary care. Rescues are often the culmination of months of preparation, and, when they happen, they're a methodical step toward putting one of an estimated 10,000 puppy mills in the U.S. out of business.

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  • Magazine Article

    From puppy mill hell to doing quite well

    A Maltese and her pups go from hell to happiness.

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