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Colleen Jaskot

Colleen Jaskot is a former staff writer for Animal Sheltering magazine at The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS). Prior to working for The HSUS, Colleen wrote for various newspapers and news wire services while getting a journalism degree from the University of Maryland.

Content by Colleen Jaskot

  • Magazine Article

    Play it safe

    Children at the Collierville Animal Services Humane Education Kids Camp in Tennessee learn the do’s and don’ts of getting acquainted with young pups.

    Shelter programs teach kids how to interact with dogs

    Shelters teach children how to safely interact with dogs.

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  • Magazine Article

    Seeds of support

    Nurturing relationships with major donors can help grow your organization

    Major gifts can boost your organization’s fundraising from so-so to stupendous, enabling you to greatly expand the reach of your lifesaving programs. But major donors aren’t going to drop out of the sky; you’ve got to grow them from the ground up. In this issue’s “Human Element” department, experts suggest ways to cultivate and sustain those relationships.

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  • Magazine Article

    Closing the door on the gas chamber

    Efforts to eliminate gas chambers nationwide have been largely successful, but the fight isn’t over

    We’re all working toward a world where no healthy, adoptable animal has to be euthanized, and statistics show we’re succeeding. But until we reach our goal, we owe shelter animals a compassionate end of life. Most outdated, inhumane euthanasia methods exist only in history books, but gas chambers are an exception. The HSUS is working to change that and, in collaboration with local advocates and organizations, has made great strides—but the chapter on gas chamber use isn’t closed yet.

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  • Magazine Article

    Can’t buy me love

    South Carolina shelter offers sweetheart deals

    Adopting out dogs for free is “not a great business model,” concedes Paula Church, community relations coordinator for Greenville County Animal Care in South Carolina. But last year, when the largest open-admission shelter in the state was desperate to get its dog population down to a manageable level—it had been doubling up dogs in kennels—that’s what it took.

    “It’s a lifesaving mission,” Church says. Of course, funds are necessary to help shelters continue their good work, but in the end, it’s “not a money-making mission. It’s about saving lives.”

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  • Magazine Article

    101 rescued cats

    Over the course of a month, Stray Cat Alliance (SCA) placed 101 cats from Kern County Animal Services, paying for their medical care before they went to new homes.

    Felines find homes thanks to two groups’ compassion and collaboration

    Last February, more than 100 cats were saved from an alleged hoarding situation disguised as a feral cat sanctuary in Mojave, California, but they weren’t out of danger. Almost all of them needed medical care, and although rescues took some cats early on, there were still 101 left at Kern County Animal Services (KCAS). The shelter had experienced huge intakes like this before, and it was always a struggle to get the animals (especially cats, not to mention supposed ferals like this group) placed in homes, says director Nick Cullen.

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  • Magazine Article

    Getting by with a little help … from your pet

    Federal laws regarding assistance animals can boost your efforts to keep pets in homes

    The stories all pretty much follow the same pattern: Resident has dog for years. Resident relies on the dog just to get through the day; maybe, due to depression, the dog is the only reason to get out of bed in the morning, or maybe walking the dog helps with heart disease problems. Resident is suddenly told dogs aren’t allowed in the building—give her up or get out. Heartbroken resident brings dog to shelter.

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