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Animal Sheltering magazine

A magazine for anyone who cares about the health and happiness of animals and people in their community, Animal Sheltering goes beyond the four walls of shelters and rescues to look at the broader picture of the state of pets in the U.S. We cover stories that inform and entertain, empowering and inspiring you in your daily work. From those working to save more animals’ lives at the shelter to those helping prevent pets from being there in the first place, we’re covering the people and organizations that are making a difference. Read us, share with us, talk to us. Together, we’re changing the story.

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  • Animal Sheltering magazine Summer 2018
  • Animal Sheltering magazine Spring 2018
  • Animal Sheltering magazine Winter 2017-2018

Scoop

  • President's Note

    Extending our reach

    Three years ago, the Humane Society of the United States and Humane Society International embarked on an important campaign in South Korea, the only nation in the world where dogs are raised on commercial farms to be slaughtered for their meat. There are thousands of such farms and millions of dogs trapped in them. But we’ve helped to transition a number of farmers to humane livelihoods and relocated their dogs for adoption. So far, we’ve closed down 11 dog meat farms and rescued more than 1,200 animals.

    Read More

  • Rescue Central

    Taxing matters

    An accountant explains deductions for animal rescue activities

    If you volunteer for an animal rescue group, you’re probably too focused on finding foster homes, arranging transports or coordinating adoption fairs to worry about personal tax write-offs. Rescuers tend to be “all-in”—investing significant amounts of their time and money into the effort while overlooking or remaining unaware of existing opportunities for tax breaks.

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  • Shelter Medicine

    Model behavior

    Humane Society Silicon Valley reaches a milestone by meeting ‘model shelter’ standards

    Like a mountain, a marathon or a long neglected inbox, the Association of Shelter Veterinarians’ standards for humane animal sheltering—all 543 of them—are out there, waiting to be conquered.

    Developed by 14 veterinary professionals and released in 2010, the ASV Guidelines for Standards of Care in Animal Shelters give animal welfare organizations of all types a road map for ongoing self-evaluation and improvement. The standards aim to help ensure that organizations recognize and meet their animals’ physical, mental and behavioral needs.

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  • Unforgettable

    A Hardy soul

    When an animal control officer brought the young cat to the Prince George’s County Animal Services Facility in Maryland, he had severe wounds to his ears, toes, limbs and tail that left him limping and weak. He had been found wandering around an apartment building, disoriented and confused. His ears were gashed open, and his toes were hanging on by threads. Because of the severity of his injuries and the fact that he would need extensive treatment, Alley Cat Rescue stepped up to handle the care of this traumatized cat.

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Explore other Animal Sheltering magazine content

  • Magazine Article

    Population control ... without the snip

    Symposium to focus on nonsurgical contraception for cats and dogs

    Web Exclusives

    The quest continues for an affordable, widely available, nonsurgical alternative to traditional spay/neuter surgery for cats and dogs. Not surprisingly, advocates wish things would move a little faster.

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  • Magazine Article

    Tour of duty

    Service members are a force for good at Virginia shelter

    Web Exclusives

    Naval Station Norfolk in Virginia’s Hampton Roads region is the country’s largest naval installation, and it’s common to see young service members in the lobby of the Norfolk SPCA. Many are there to adopt or to bring their pets to the shelter’s veterinary clinic; others come to volunteer their time to help homeless animals.

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  • Magazine Article

    Powerful partnerships

    David Stroud with the Cashiers-Highlands Humane Society in North Carolina removes pups from a breeding mill several hours from his shelter. Many shelter and rescue partners cross county or state lines to assist in large rescues.

    Network connects shelters in need with critical resources

    Summer 2018

    It started with a run-of-the-mill barking complaint. But when officers with Habersham County (Georgia) Department of Animal Care & Control arrived at the property in April 2017, they discovered one of the state’s largest puppy mill operations.

    More than 350 animals were living on the property, and not just dogs. There were cats, donkeys, pigs, chickens, ducks, doves, an alpaca and a horse, all in deplorable conditions. Many of the dogs were confined to plastic tubs and under wire mesh, surrounded by mud and feces.

    Read More

  • Magazine Article

    Extending our reach

    Summer 2018

    Three years ago, the Humane Society of the United States and Humane Society International embarked on an important campaign in South Korea, the only nation in the world where dogs are raised on commercial farms to be slaughtered for their meat. There are thousands of such farms and millions of dogs trapped in them. But we’ve helped to transition a number of farmers to humane livelihoods and relocated their dogs for adoption. So far, we’ve closed down 11 dog meat farms and rescued more than 1,200 animals.

    Read More

  • Magazine Article

    No place like home

    Sundae (getting a hug here from Tatiana Garzon as Annie) didn’t take to playing Sandy on stage, but she took on the new role of family pet through Safe Haven Animal Sanctuary.

    In New Mexico, theater productions promote adoptable canines

    Summer 2018

    One of the best reasons to see a live performance of The Wizard of Oz or Annie is to experience the moment when a real dog trots on stage and leaps into the arms of Dorothy or Annie.

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  • Magazine Article

    Soup for skittish souls

    Coconut (left) was initially the most emotionally damaged dog from this Michigan puppy mill rescue, says the ASPCA’s Kristen Collins, but in 2013, she graduated from the nonprofit’s behavioral rehabilitation program with flying colors.

    Canine rehab research results in permanent facility and mentorship program

    Summer 2018

    In June 2010, the ASPCA assisted local authorities in Tennessee with a hoarding case, racing in the blistering heat to catch, assess and transport 100 dogs to partner shelters.

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