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Shelter medicine and wellness

Very often what we see as neglect from pet owners is actually the result of their inability to access veterinary services and other pet wellness resources. For example, there may be a free, local spay/neuter clinic but it’s on the other side of town and transportation is a problem. Or the $400 dental cleaning simply isn’t affordable. Identify what obstacles are preventing people in your community from providing wellness care for their pets and present ways to overcome them in order to make sure people can keep their pets happy, healthy and in their homes.

Most recent Tools and Resources > Shelter medicine and wellness

  • Magazine Article

    Identifying and treating mouths full of hurt

    Cats won't open up and say "ah" when they've got a toothache.

    Cats with dental problems may be suffering in silence

    It wasn’t that long ago that we failed to understand pain in our companion animals. You may recall veterinarians in the past saying things like, “Animals don’t feel pain like we do.”

    In fact, when I went to veterinary school in the late-1980s, we weren’t taught to provide pain relievers for animals after common procedures such as spay/neuter or dental work, including extraction of teeth. Typically, our patients received short-acting pain medicine in the hospital, and then were sent home to rest and recover.

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  • Blog Post

    Cat equality now!

    Too often, our feline friends get the short stick on medical care. We can help!

    August 22nd is National Bring Your Cat to the Vet Day. It seems like kind of a weird holiday, but it makes more sense when you consider the fact that half of cats in this country don’t get regular veterinary care. It’s true, according to a 2012 survey of cat owners by Bayer Healthcare in conjunction with the American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP). And we’re talking about owned cats, not un-owned or loosely owned community cats.

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  • Magazine Article

    Walking a mile in the other veterinarian’s shoes

    Public health veterinarian Tamerin Scott, right, a frequent volunteer at the Amanda Foundation’s quarterly Wags for Wellness in Watts clinics in Los Angeles, delivers a pooch into waiting arms.

    Shelter vets and private practitioners can save lives through collaboration

    Ideally, all veterinarians would work in harmony to ensure animals in their communities receive the medical attention they need. Unfortunately, relationships between shelter veterinarians and private practitioners are often marked by misunderstanding or mistrust. The persistent, misguided stereotypes—private vets are greedy, shelter vets provide inferior care—can make cooperation difficult. In Southern California, the veterinary community is trying to improve communication between the two camps—with the goal of greater understanding and partnerships to benefit animals.

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